College Of The Assumption

The Photo above is from the book “Picturesque Detroit & Environs” published in 1893. It shows what is today Assumption University. This appears to be after phase three of the construction.

A postcard from the early 1900’s. As you can see the building has received another addition to the north. This appears to be phase four.

Here are a set of blueprints dated March 1875, which appear to be for phase two. This wing was added on to an existing building that was located south of this addition.

As you can see this distinctive entrance on a 45 degree angle, is clearly visible in the photos above.

Phase one, that this addition tied into was located behind this wing, and is not visible in either photo above.

The building in the blueprints was located on the south side of the current building, and according to what I understand, was demolished after a partial collapse in the mid 1960’s. If you look at the south wall of the current building you can see a patch and a scar in the brickwork, where this building stood.

It’s hard to make out the name of the architect off the blueprints, it looks like S.M. Sredard. It’s not a name that is familiar to me, or one that shows up on any other architectural works. But at the end of his name, it states, “Arch., Windsor, Ont.”. So he was definitely a local architect.

If anyone knows anything about Assumption College, feel free to comment…

Windsor Taught Me Everything I know

If you’re looking for something interesting to do on a Tuesday night, head on over to the Downtown Library, and check out the Tuesday Talks, featuring Windsor native (and frequent commentor) Shawn Micallef , and his talk entitled: “Windsor Taught Me Everything I know”.

Join writer Shawn Micallef in discussing how growing up in an automotive border town inspired him to pursue urban-minded projects. Associate editor of Spacing Magazine, Micallef created the mobile phone documentary called [murmur] which allows people to hear memories and stories of specific geographic locations.

Date: Tuesday, November 6, 2007
Time: 6:30pm – 7:30pm
Location: Central Branch — Fred Israel Auditorium
Street: 850 Ouellette Avenue, Windsor, ON

Standard Foundry

On Walker Rd., just south of the no longer existent Cataraqui Place, stood the Kerr Engine Works plant. The plant had two divisions, Kerr Engine Works and Standard Foundry & Supply Co.

A view of the 1937 Fire Plan

An artists view of the plant c. 1910.

As time went on Kerr closed its doors, yet the foundry continued. The foundry was sold, and the search for a more suitable home took place in the early 1960’s.

The site (as seen in this 1963 photograph) for the new foundry was chosen at 3827 Peter St., and in 1965 the plant opened in it’s new home with a new name: Standard Induction Castings. The plant closed for good, in the summer of 2007. Thanks to Ken for the scans of the photos included in today’s post.

The aerial survey photo from 1963 did yield a few interesting items…

This school at Chappell and Peter? Westenders, anyone remember this one? Today it is just a vacant lot.

The old Chappell House/Lido/Lido Venice/Rum Runners/President’s Club. A nice view of the old roadhouse before she was altered and met her sad end.

Unbuilt Windsor – # 5

From June 1927:


This 12 story building was designed by Pennington & Boyde, it was supposed to be built at Pitt & Dougall. It was going to be home to the North American Athletic Club.

The plan was for floors 5-11 to be filled with rooms, similar to the YMCA.

It’s a shame that these buildings featured this week weren’t realized. Windsor might have looked very different if these building had risen beyond the drawing board.

Unbuilt Windsor – # 4

From December 1928:


This building was to be the tallest hotel in the British Empire. Designed by O’Dell, Trace & Diehl, it was to be part of the Royal Windsor Complex. The Apartment Building (still standing) and Garage (demolished) were the first two phases. This was to be the third and final part. It was to be located at the vacant Southeast corner of London (University) & Dougall.